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, paying his visit to capitol hill. why do we not see that any more? is it two sides or environment is so hardened? >> i think so. i also think that personality of these two men would not be best described as anti-social they to. but we're seeing this weird culture of bipartisan, you know we were supposed to put it away after the elect, and think about what is best of the country. i think they are staaing separate, they should be eating at the same table now. neil: they are not doing that. there is so much you could dodo with a serogate, and say surprise it seems to me, dr., doctor when ronald reagan heard things come up out of capitol hill, or tip o'neill he brought him over to the white house, said how can we compromise on this his famous line, i would rather get 80% of a loaf or no loaf at all, we don't see it, it is either my way or the highway, and i blame motorcycl both side. >> i do too, you said the word, compromise that is what works in great marriaging and even politics. meet in the middle. neil: why not have it at the white house? i think that white house, if you do something i
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty"? >> i would've changed quite a lot. there's all kinds of details that a changed. but i found that to try to change one thing would be to change everything. so you know, you get into the morass of editorial work. so instead of changing an essentially retained the old look and added 40,000 new words at the beginning and kind and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. it's a new book, but it contains the old book veered >> pennysaver bishop monetary policy, what do you mean by that? >> i failed to make clear in the original version of "wealth and poverty" that i believe can stable currencies. i don't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to
. the most extreme environments. it's not the best place to look for life. in fact, there is water. in fact, the water is located in deep craters, near the north pole. mercury kind of orbits with very little tilt. near the north pole with the deep craters, it never gets subject. that's why it's so cold. but much of the water is covered by a thin layer of organic material. >> all right. i think we're having a little trouble hearing lawrence there. we'll try and get him back because it is a really interesting discussion. we'll work on that. >>> his resume includes two academy awards, five golden globes, and an emmy. now dustin hoffman will be able to add a new honor to that impressive list. we'll tell you what it is. >>> first, if you're looking for a getaway, think springtime in paris. that's where we find our this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. if y
environment. we may find ourselves in a different in varmint in which they will have less choice. the actuarial estimates are that the fha books of business will more than pay for themselves. what we're looking for them to do is pay for the losses we incurred when we were playing a counter-cyclical role. the phrase i always use, it is inherent to an insurance model. fha does it for a public purpose. there is a point at which -- i have had plenty of economists argue that it is not rational for us to charge today's home buyers more than it costs us to pay for the losses of the past. we had a large, traumatic, national emergency. think of it as the hurricane sandy or hurricane katrina of the housing market. maybe the public sector ought to say -- the economists say we should write the check for the treasury and we should go back to starting the future homebuyers at a price that is rational. the financing mechanism and the like. i think we should do that, with there are limits to how far you can do that. there are limits to what you can do with the pricing. when the private market co
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and littl
and in the environment grow more numerous and more fearsome. in response, progressives of all stripes coalesce, find their voice and their strength and pioneer the development of a powerful set of new ideas and policy proposals confirming that the path to a better world does, indeed, exist. demonstrations and protests multiply, and a popular movement for pro-democracy reform and transformative change is born. at the local level, people in groups plant the seeds of change through a host of innovative initiatives that provide inspirational models of how things might work in a new political economy devoted to sustaining human and natural communities. and sensing the direction in which things are moving, our wiser and more responsible leaders rise to the occasion, support the growing movement for change and frame a compelling story or narrative that makes sense of it all and provides a positive vision of a better america. the movement broadens to become a major national force. we don't know exactly how these or other forces will emerge or interact, but we do know this: that pleas for immediate action, f
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
. who have good home environments, right? who don't run a crazy ship at home. the kids with a crazy environment, homework hurts then. we have to make it equitable and fair for them to have the same environment to work on the crazy, familiarial problem. >> greg: what is french homework? riding a bicycle with a basket and bah quet? >> andrea: drinking red wine and smoking cigarettes. you got a-plus. >> bob: they go home and get loaded with wine. >> greg: i'm half french. bost you are? >> greg: yes. >> andrea: oh hl la. >> dana: que paso. >> greg: what does that mean? >> dana: what's up in spanish. >> greg: what does vit to do with this? you know who words from a language. >> dana: no. i know more than that. i do. i swear. feliz navidad. that is coming up, how much do they know about fe will beiz navdad? andrea hit the streets to find out. >> can you name tall santa reindeer? >> prancer. >> ♪ on this 12th day of christmas my true love gave to me 12 --" >> geese allaying. >> dana: christmas trivia directly ahead. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned somet
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
me go into an environment and go doubling around and that, find out that i sort of like honey boo boo, that is a huge part of the american television experience and it gets sold short when you get techno is t-- ecstatic. a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping passivity and be able to roam around the tv jungle of finding things it did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, monday night at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators." >> tomorrow, join us for reform and how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include gene sperling, harvard university president, and former congresswoman and portugal vice-president, susan molinari. - google vice-president, susan molinari. from the american enterprise institute, join us live, 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c- span. president obama troubles monday to an auto plant in michigan to merge congress to extend tax breaks for 998% of americans.
allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
environment, a huge life skill competitive sports in particular, extraordinary gain of american football. >> would you want for christmas? >> record by the dolphins but maybe we are off. we will see. i know i should aim higher. >> happy birthday. we are honored, we appreciate you being here. thank you for watching us. we are thankful for the partnership, thank you for coming out so early. thank you for a fantastic conversation. [applause] >> thank you for having me. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 and they are going to say that is a precedent and indiana had -- >> talking about facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i d. they did not say that all of those states would subsequently -- [talking over each other] >> let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. [talking over each other] >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities because it -- somehow we have something missing in our brain.
on both environment and genetics. we have established large networks to collect data and conduct powerful analyses. those networks explore possible causative factors in the environment before, during and after pregnancy. one of these networks published a study that suggests prenatal and early life exposure to car emissions is a factor. in 2012, congress appropriated over $47 million for autism and other developmental disorders. this supports 43 training programs through 41 states and projects for underserved populations. federal agencies also use public-private partnerships to maximize our, such as the nih national data office of research that has an autism depository. this brings together hundreds of researchers and clinicians with tens of thousands of people nationwide affected by asd. there is a call center, web based -- the nih supported the association in the early prevention of autism. in conclusion, since the establishment, wide expertise has come to bear on autism with research rapidly translating into individuals and the community. coordinated efforts to identify best practices t
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
by the fact that we are a low interest-rate environment? >> we have not finished those calculations. we are in the midst of doing that for the budget. they are both large effects. we simply do not have an answer to that. >> it is a large effect that comes from the difference in interest rates. you know the low interest-rate environment customs? >> let me ask my team behind me to get that. we will have that for you in a moment. >> my guess is i am not sure that assumption is as low as the rate is today with an interest-rate of 1.6%, it is shockingly low. we have a fed insisting it will keep this way. i will be interested to see what the net effect of this interest rate is. >> there is an artificiality of the point in time because it presumes every one of the payoffs, we have no revenue to fha, where we know there is a large revenue -- >> there is a flaw in the model? >> no. congress requires the review is done in a runoff scenario. we also looked at, what if we keep doing business, so we have those projections. that is not the 2% calculation. it is something we could give you more detail
, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the am more at thisization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the de
environment? all these special dividends. oracle is doing it now, second quarter, third quarter dividends this month so investors can get taxed at the 2012 dividend rate. >> it's bigger than that because it's not only the corporation themselves but corporate executives. cashing out options looking for preferential tax treatment there as well. that's just prudent corporate management. you can't fault them. stocks paying special dividends have been outperforming the spx in the time period since this started happening. in some ways in the convoluted way it's been a positive for the market. >> oracle is down, though o this news. >> oracle is down right now. gordon, you make a really good point. that's where the performance has been, the conditions paying these special dividends. when i see an announcement like this, you as an investor, would you buy these companies paying special dif depends to make sure the tax rate is a low rate versus what we may see in 2013? >> certainly it might be an opportunity short term, over a short horizon. i'm not sure i want to lend to those companies. i'm the bo
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
state. >> a lot of places have drug-free work environments. now doesn't that come into question at least for today in washington state? is it the same as having a beer at lunch and coming to work? smoke a joint and come to work in what was a drug-free environment? >> it's a wonderful question. the effects will be different depending on one's tolerance. ultimately an employer has as right to expect when they employ people to come to work they are able and fit to do the job for which they were hired. certainly if there is as it relates to alcohol you're not sober and as it relates to marijuana you are a bit hazy of the mind, the employer would legally be well within their rights to take the appropriate action which means if you smoke too much, you're fired. >> guess that's a good answer to a clever conundrum they find themselves in. thank you so much. appreciate it. >>> coming up in ten minutes as well, the los angeles mayor is going to join me. he's going to talk about a federal crackdown on medical marijuana in california and now how all of this might square and he's also going to weigh
they are and will they be able to perform regardless of the macro environment? >> all right. we are focused on. companies that can grow regardless of what happens in the economy. three stocks we like, one is denbury resources. what's interesting about them is they have hedged their forward sales of oil so the lowest they're going to receive is $80 next year. at those rates, they're going to be a very profitable company. it's a very inexpensive stock. we like that. it's a u.s. oil producer as well. we like that. link linkedin, we think attracted as much attention as it should. they're executing very well in the professional business social networking sense. in particular, head hunters across the globe. this is now the method of head hunting. finally, an enterprise software design company used in making semiconductor chips. we see them as providing a very stable and growing play on technology without necessarily having to pick, you know, end winners. >> got it. >> thank you. >> very good, guys. thank you all for joining us today. rick, good luck with the reappraisal on your property there, whatever you're
environment. >> brenda: larry. >> brenda, the younes need to reinvent themselves. if they need to get into my skilled jobs and earn higher wages and that's the key. >> you're right and the idea of organizing the lowest end of the structure here is, as jonas says, the average lifetime of employee i think is nine mons in the fast food busins so it's antithetical and-- >> these an't coal mines and slaughter houses, brenda, these are folding sweaters at the gap, cashiers. >> we need to see more unions in china where they could make a difference, they could lift wages and improve living standards there. >> absolutely. >> and keep chinese, work forces from taking jobs away from america. >> good luck with that. >> brenda: thank you for the debate. and sandy victims facing devastation one month later, so is this any time for the united nations to be using them as a fund raising tool? the cavuto gang is all over that one at the bottom of the hour. up here first, forget fees in >> forget the pain, if we fall into the financial ditch. a new regulation in the the health care law might mauck you down rig
in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white house is counting on and sort of rubbing its hands together hoping to get. they're not going to get an
the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the legislation. to those affects and to those who are supporting the people affected by this issue, really, it's serving as kind of a buffer to what could have been a real crisis. as a housing rights advocate for the mission collaborative for the past five years and a friend of many people who have had bed bugs i have wintered firsthand the devastating affects on lives. and so i can really appreciate this a[pro-rb/] and thank you to the working group that put this together. it puts in place procedures and policies that make it easier for housing advocates and tenant communitis to navigate this process, but we know we can put what we like on paper and promise to follow it to the best our abilitis and commit to the law whenever necessary, but un
we are decreasing our carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has
and be curious in a hands-on environment just like real scientists. with over 100 interactive encounters to choose from, a few of my son's favorites include the clubhouse build in the trees and human fossils and the simulating river that seems to be swimming when they step on it. >> naturequest is this amazingly fun world that's scientifically lis tick. you can explore from the oceans and top of the mountains and everywhere you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to
on a new, we have the un at trading on the environment. this makes no difference -- >> why not throw a bone to bob dole? >> why throw a bone to the un? >> oh. >> is run byy dictatotors, it has a human rights committee with the worst violators in the world. why should we give any legitimacy at all? give me an answer on that. >> the chamber of commerce supports the street, along with the veterans' organizations and religis groups. they suprt it because the united states has been the leader in this area and they would like other countries to comply, make -- >> it is modeled on the americans with disabilities act. >> i know that, but it has no effect -- >> the point of the treaty is get other countries to become signatories and i got to the language and the intent of the treaty, to look out for people with disabilities. you accept the arguments. >> yeah, exactly the way the u.n. human r rights commission has spread human rights to countries around the world. it does nothing. >> you used to call people who thought like this nativist. >> it s notng to do with it nativism. the u.n. is a perniciou
have environments that are built where kids feel like they're connected to the school. that's why you always hear me talk about do our kids really feel like someone at the school knows them and understands them and they can go to the person if they have a problem with anything. some schools are doing extremely well. some schools are building the system now. >> he is also engaging students through social media and they could submit questions through twitter as well as facebook. >>> making national headlines today. members of the team gathered to say farewell. players coaches and staff joined belcher's family and friends at a memorial service yesterday. belcher killed himself in a murder/suicide last week. he killed his girlfriend perkins at their home saturday morning and then shot himself in front of chiefs' coaches and management at the stadium. belcher and perkins leave behind a 3-month-old daughter. >>> the aurora, colorado movie theater where the gunman opened fire earlier this year getting ready to reopen. the city's mayor says it will open to the public on january 18th. before
by the american people and your businesses and the economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. you know, john engler, he and i philosophically do not agree on much -- [ laughter ] >> you know, i am just being honest about john. he ii a great politician. he comes from the other party. he is exactly right when he says the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for is destroying your credit rating. i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggest that they will type negotiations to that feeling both and take us to the brink of default onne again, as part of a budget to go she asian, which, by the way, we have never done in our history, until we did it last year, i will not play that game. with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve this fairly quickly. we have some tough spending cuts. we have modest revenue increases. you get business certainty. you do what you do best. and, we then have an open running world next year to deal with a whole host of other issues like in
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
later and when we get to next year we are in an economy that is in a higher tax environment, companies will grow less well if that environment, association whatever cash they have, and they have available to pay out, will be taxed at a high are rate. >>neil: what do you make of the argument we had much higher dividend tax rates in the reagan administration, a good part of the clinton administration, and we did fine. >>guest: it was great to be a world monopoly. a wonderful thing to have the expire world recovering from world war ii but that is not where we are. higher taxes hurt economic growth. people say it doesn't hurt it and they are saying of all the possible answers i will pick the extreme one, which is zero. what is most iportant? millions are out of work, we have incomes that have not grown but they have fallen. i would think growth is the priority. >>neil: is that going do mean more dividends next year to make up for the tax hit they will face? will they still cash out with the dividends? isn't that going do lead to a market tank? >>guest: one of the things, what we are seeing
've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans and big business love right to work laws. they are a way of destroying unions. the same heritage foundation that will be jim demint's new home says union membership fell by 15% in states that passed right to work. union organizing fell by half, passing a right to work law stops unions and it stops organizing. on the labor left, the economic policy institute reports that wages fall by more than 3% after you institute ri
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
of hearing about frankly. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal. and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: catherine, let me ask you, what i look what happened with the case in darden, it seems like what happened to a bunch of different companies, my take at the end of the day, for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need are jobs, jobs, jobs. there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what will happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations. we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: jamie, do you think to a c
of their people here, in this environment, there is little reason to lock at promising u.s., what is attracting money to places like switzerland, that it is not, inhibiting capital forming a and grrwth, we are. this has been developinn under republicans and democratic presidents alike with rules and regulations this is a very unfriendly environment to business. >> tax -- real tax rate for the large corporations, many who pay no federal income tax is 17%, it is not 35% or 30%, that is the tax rate, due to all loopholes. neil: i know, we can get into this argument. the real tax rate in japan now north of 13%, we can go back and forth on this but trend is up here, there are a lot of countries where reversing or slowing there, that is to a businessman looking to expand a good reason to expand. >> let's lower the bar, let's expect these u.s. corporationss3 with their privilages they have been given, as least keep as much money her as percentage -- >> you act like they are doing nothing here. they are hiring people, and growing hire, they have done a well the here, and our thank you to them. >> as we
states, inflict damage, physical and reputational, on the jordanian government in an environment in which all other governments are certainly dealing with their own difficulties right now. >> reporter: all 11 suspects were rounded up by jordanian security forces in mid october. jordanian officials say they'd planned to strike on november 9th, the seventh anniversary of the last al qaeda attack in jordan. when suicide bombers struck three hotels in amman, killing about 60 people. the man who claimed responsible for that attack was al zarqawi who led the group al qaeda in iraq. he was killed by u.s. forces in 2006. but analysts say the recent resurgence of al qaeda in iraq shows an unsettling pattern. >> we thought we had them essentially pushed to the wall and snuffed out to a large degree. some individuals were released from prison in iraq and rejoined this group. and certainly when you have a country that is unstable like iraq and you have tremendous sectarian tension there and violence, the more from the sunni side on to the shiite side, you can't be surprised that a group like al qaeda
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
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